To see our schedule with full functionality, like timezone conversion and personal scheduling, please enable JavaScript and go here.
08:30
08:30
60min
Registration & Breakfast
Main Track
09:30
09:30
15min
Opening Event

The Opening Event for the Open Source Firmware Conference 2023

Main Track
09:45
09:45
30min
The Art of Firmware
Ritvi Mishra

Open-source firmware is revolutionizing the world of technology, offering endless possibilities for creative exploration. This talk will delve into the exciting intersection of open-source firmware and art projects, revealing the power of combining technology and creativity to foster a unique learning experience. Participants will discover how to leverage open-source firmware to create interactive art installations, kinetic sculptures, and more, simultaneously unleashing their creativity and technical prowess.

Main Track
10:15
10:15
15min
Q&A
Main Track
10:30
10:30
30min
US Cyber Trust Mark: Is your firmware ready?
Allan Jude

How the forthcoming "US Cyber Trust Mark" certification may impact firmware development and the devices it is installed on, as well as some of the unique challenges Open Source projects will face in trying to address the certification requirements and process.

Main Track
11:00
11:00
15min
Q&A
Main Track
11:15
11:15
30min
Meta's OpenBMC process: a case study from the Bletchley system
Patrick Williams

Meta has historically used their own BMC code stack, confusingly also called "OpenBMC", but having nearly nothing in common with the Linux Foundation project of the same name. A transition to the Linux Foundation code base is underway and our first production system using that code is a chassis controller named "Bletchley". This talk will discuss the approach we took, collaborating with our JDM, to develop OpenBMC in an "upstream-first" manner.

Main Track
11:45
11:45
15min
Q&A
Main Track
12:00
12:00
75min
Lunch & Social Break
Main Track
13:15
13:15
30min
Enabling coreboot for Open System Firmware on Arm servers
Jeffrey Booher-Kaeding, Milo-D, Unnamed user

Arm and 9elements share their progress towards developing a coreboot firmware stack for Arm servers. Showcasing proof of concepts, and discuss the challenges faced when developing a new firmware stack to fit existing software expectations.

Main Track
13:45
13:45
15min
Q&A
Main Track
14:00
14:00
30min
Tamago and tinygo: working with firmware and kernel written in Go!
ronald g. minnich

Tamago and TinyGo are Go compilers for bare metal; both firmware and small kernels have been written using them. In this talk, I will describe what I have learned by working with these two compilers; discuss the benefits of having the Go runtime available in firmware; provide a demo of each in action; and close by describing how they have turned my preconceptions about firmware languages on their head.

Main Track
14:30
14:30
15min
Q&A
Main Track
14:45
14:45
15min
Break
Main Track
15:00
15:00
30min
Aligned on RISC-V
Daniel Maslowski

Looking at multiple RISC-V firmware projects and processors, this talk compares how their approaches to providing a RISC-V platform align, such that operating systems and applications can be easily ported across them.

Main Track
15:30
15:30
15min
Q&A
Main Track
15:45
15:45
30min
Unplugging the Debugger: Live and post-mortem debugging in a remote system
Matt Keeter

When building an embedded system, there comes a time when you must unplug your debugger and seal the device in a box. Unfortunately, things can still go wrong after this point! The Hubris embedded OS has put a strong emphasis on debuggability, even to the point of writing Humility, an in-house debugger. However, Humility has historically assumed a physical connection to a running microcontroller. As we begin sealing up boxes, we’ve had to develop a range of tricks for mostly-seamless debugging of a network-connected system. Strategies range from forging inter-task IPC messages and calling arbitrary functions over the network, to (safely) reading and decoding memory from the running system, and even using a secondary microcontroller to take a full memory image of the main system for post-mortem debugging!

Main Track
16:15
16:15
15min
Q&A
Main Track
16:30
16:30
300min
Oxide Field Trip
Main Track
08:30
08:30
60min
Breakfast
Main Track
09:30
09:30
30min
Provision Open Source Firmware system at scale
Jean-Marie Verdun, Elyes Zekri

We will introduce concept to automatically provision OpenSource Firmware (starting from the BMC side) at scale within datacenter. That is a co-presentation between HPE and Scaleway a french cloud service provider

Main Track
10:00
10:00
15min
Q&A
Main Track
10:15
10:15
30min
U-Boot as a coreboot payload
Simon Glass

Overview of how to use U-Boot as a coreboot payload and the benefits of doing so

Main Track
10:45
10:45
15min
Q&A
Main Track
11:00
11:00
30min
Break
Main Track
11:30
11:30
30min
Towards authentication of transparent systems
Fredrik Stromberg

We will present our ongoing work on the System Transparency Authentication Mechanism (STAM), ST's evolving design philosophy and the benefits of transparent systems to service providers.

Main Track
12:00
12:00
15min
Q&A
Main Track
12:15
12:15
30min
Reproducible Builds All The Way Down
Vagrant Cascadian

bit-for-bit identical binaries at the lowest levels

Reproducible Builds enables bit-for-bit identical comparison,
providing a strong link that the binaries used are the result of
building the source code.

Main Track
12:45
12:45
15min
Q&A
Main Track
13:00
13:00
45min
Lunch Break
Main Track
13:45
13:45
30min
Turn your code inside-out: programming (and debugging) bare metal with async Rust
Cliff L. Biffle

Rust has gotten a lot of attention in the embedded space lately, but there's an under-appreciated language feature that can be uniquely enabling for writing drivers and resource-constrained code: async. The async transform takes code written in the usual way -- with loops, function calls, and the like -- and inverts it into an explicit state machine that can be stepped in response to events. This gives developers the benefits of both simple "straight-line" code, such as readability and structured control flow, combined with the benefits of writing explicit state machines by hand, such as lower resource usage compared to threads or nested interrupts for concurrency. But more importantly, it provides something that's hard to achieve in explicit state machines: automatic composition of state machines, with type and lifetime checking.

This talk will propose an embedded-specific way of viewing Rust's async feature, look at how to apply it to solve certain common firmware problems, and touch on the elephant in the room: debugger support. Examples will use the author's open-source async embedded OS, lilos, and a proof-of-concept debugger for embedded async Rust.

Main Track
14:15
14:15
15min
Q&A
Main Track
14:30
14:30
30min
asynchronous dbus with C++ co-routines
Patrick Williams

sdbusplus generates ergonomic and compile-time type-checked dbus bindings built atop sd-bus. This library is heavily used within the OpenBMC project to provide all IPC between its many userspace processes. This talk will give an overview of how OpenBMC leverages dbus, how sdbusplus facilitates its usage, as well as an introduction on our approach for asynchronous programming with C++ co-routines.

Main Track
15:00
15:00
15min
Q&A
Main Track
15:15
15:15
30min
Break
Main Track
15:45
15:45
30min
Field practice on BMC coredump analysis
Lei Yu, Jian Zhang

Bytedance's practice about automactic coredump analysis, including
* ipks collection in CI;
* Coredump collections;
* debug_dump tool introduction;
* Integration of alarms and analysis.

Main Track
16:15
16:15
15min
Q&A
Main Track
16:30
16:30
30min
When boot security goes wrong: the story of the IGNOREME GPT
Julius Werner

This talk is going to tell the tale of a critical security vulnerability that was found a year after launch on the RK3288 ("veyron") family of Chromebooks and allowed bypassing the entire secure boot stack. It will explain the technical details of this vulnerability, why it was overlooked in the first place, the tricky process to mitigate it, and finally give a real answer to this guy's stack overflow question: https://superuser.com/questions/1399681/what-is-the-gpt-header-signature-for

Main Track
17:00
17:00
15min
Q&A
Main Track
17:15
17:15
30min
So you think you found a hardware issue: from misunderstandings to CVEs
Laura Abbott

Writing correct firmware requires understanding hardware at the lowest possible level. More frequently than the average programmer, firmware authors may discover fundamental problems with the hardware which must be reported to the manufacturer. Getting resolution of these types of issues can be tedious and frustrating for all parties involved at the best of times. In the worst cases communication may break down between reporter and manufacturer resulting in denial of a problem, obfuscation and poor or no resolution of a problem.

The difficulties in reporting hardware issues stem from many of the cultural issues with traditional proprietary firmware. As with open firmware, there needs to be a better path forward for the industry for hardware issues.

Main Track
09:30
09:30
75min
Breakfast
Main Track
09:30
30min
Breakfast
Workshop I
10:00
10:00
60min
Embarking on the Zephyr Journey: A Beginner's Guide to the Open Source RTOS
Ritvi Mishra

Real-time operating systems (RTOS) can seem complex for beginners. This session aims to simplify this complexity by providing a comprehensive introduction to Zephyr, a user-friendly open source RTOS. We'll explain the foundational RTOS concepts and highlight the specific benefits of Zephyr. We'll then guide attendees through the setup of a Zephyr development environment and the creation of a simple application. Additionally, the session will introduce the vibrant Zephyr community and provide guidance on how to contribute and interact within it. Whether you're a developer, hobbyist, or student, this talk will serve as a valuable launchpad into the world of Zephyr and open source RTOS.

Workshop I
10:45
10:45
15min
Theming the OpenBMC GUI to meet company requirements
Gunnar Mills

webui-vue, OpenBMC's web-based user interface, allows for customization and styling to meet brand requirements. Custom navigation, adding and removing pages and features, different fonts, and unique colors are all available.

Main Track
11:00
11:00
15min
TKey project update
Sasko Simonovski

Last year at OSFC in Gothenburg, we revealed ourselves and our radically open source security key - TKey - to the world. A lot has happened since and we are back with an an update.

Main Track
11:15
11:15
30min
Q&A
Main Track
11:45
11:45
15min
Building an Open Source Ecosystem for the Framework 16
Daniel Schaefer

The Framework 16 laptop has the most flexible input module system of any laptop on the market. The unique design allows endless customization that is powered by open source firmware.

Main Track
12:00
12:00
15min
DAPLink: the side-kick to your next project?
Mathias Brossard

DAPLink is an Open Source firmware from Arm based on CMSIS-DAP. The main goal of CMSIS-DAP is turning microcontrollers into debug probes (SWD, JTAG, SWO). DAPLink adds many features on top (Drag and drop flashing, serial adapter, bootloader updates, WebUSB, etc.) which is why it has been included in many development boards or on discrete entry-level probes. Projects like the BBC micro:bit have shown how the features of DAPLink can be used and extended to go beyond an on PCB debug probe and become an integral part of a project.

Main Track
12:00
60min
Getting started with System Transparency
Jens Drenhaus

In this workshop, you will learn about the current state of the System Transparency project.

System Transparency is a security architecture for bare-metal servers. It's bootloader stboot protects and makes your boot chain auditable. It uses LinuxBoot, TPM, and signature verification. Furthermore, it is reproducible, with plans to incorporate Binary Transparency. Correctly integrated, it can make a system transparent to you and even your end users.
With System Transparency, all OS-related artifacts including the user space are bundled together in a signed OS Package. The core idea is that stboot verifies this OS package before booting.

Since the project is still at version zero state and there are quite some bits and peaces which have to be brought together. So this workshop is just the right place for you if you would like to become an early adopter, learn and discuss the concepts of System Transparency or just want to start playing around with the project.

There are also some work-in-progress features like remote attestation integration we are currently developing but are already ready to try out.

Workshop I
12:15
12:15
30min
Q&A
Main Track
12:45
12:45
15min
OpenBMC Flash Layouts and Firmware Updates
Adriana Kobylak

Deep dive into the currently supported flash layouts, filesystems, and firmware update options in OpenBMC, how to choose which one to use, and how to enable each.

Main Track
13:00
13:00
15min
Status update for AMD openSIL and Coreboot integration
Varshit Pandya, Martin L Roth

This is a status update on current status of AMD openSIL project, openSIL code base has been upstream on public GitHub, coreboot port for 4th Generation AMD EPYC Processor should be open for review before end of July.

Main Track
13:15
13:15
15min
Q&A
Main Track
13:30
13:30
60min
Lunch Break
Main Track
13:30
60min
Lunch Break
Workshop I
14:30
14:30
60min
Develop for TKey
Michael 'MC' Cardell Widerkrantz, Daniel Hansson

Workshop on getting started with developing apps for TKey. The end-goal is for all participants to be able to build and run TKey applications.

We will have a short presentation about the architecture and building blocks, introducing the toolchain and emulator for TKey, while spending the majority of the time on a code walkthrough - which you should be able to follow on your computer.

If you want to come fully prepared to the workshop you can;
- install podman and download our tkey-builder:2 container image (instructions: https://dev.tillitis.se/tools/#toolchain-container-tkey-builder)
- Clone our repositories:
github.com/tillitis/tkey-sign-cli
github.com/tillitis/tkey-device-signer
github.com/tillitis/tkey-libs

Workshop I
14:30
30min
Open Mic - Embedded Rust: 5 tips and tricks

I work on Ti50, firmware for the Google Security Chip written in extremely space-constrained Rust. In this talk, I share some simple tips and tricks that I used to reduce the code size of our codebase, as well as some general guidance to understand how to get started on embedded Rust.

Main Track
15:00
15:00
30min
Open Mic - Chrultrabook: A preview of porting Windows to x86-64 chromebooks

The status of running Windows with coreboot and edk2 payload on x86-64 chromebooks. For those interested, will also go over what to look for when getting a chromebook, and why to get a chromebook to run Windows. Will also give a preview of the technical challenges with bringing Windows to chromebooks, since I plan on doing a full talk next year to do a deeper dive on the process of fixing Windows up to run with coreboot and some of chromebooks' specialized hardware.

Main Track
15:30
15:30
15min
Closing
Main Track